WHAT IS LOADED MOVEMENT TRAINING (LMT)

We can describe any Loaded Movement Training exercise as a multidirectional resistance based movement. In other words, taking a sub-maximal load and move with it. In order to be efficient and avoid injuries your body has to be resilient and reactive.

One of the major principle in LMT is VECTOR VARIABILITY. It basically means to vary positions and directions of our movement. By doing so, we receive force from many angles which fortify stronger tissue and place more challenge on the nervous system.

If we want a strong balance body that is effective in all three planes of motion with gravity, ground reaction forces and the momentum we must have effective synergy between the 3-dimensional connective tissue structure in our body. To accomplish this goal we must consider angles and vectors when we train in order to prevent areas of weakness.

HOW YOU CAN MANIPULATE ANY LMT EXERCISE

This is very important question because you will learn some, for you, new exercises and that’s usually mean that you may not feel what you want to feel. So in order to get most our of the LMT concept I suggest to practice in a chunks, a small sequences until you marry all movements together.

The main goal is to keep you safe but allow you to experiment. Don’t be too concern about “perfect” technique. I will teach you an easy way how to manipulate any exercise. The video below is an example of something I call a Bubble.

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  1. SMALL BUBBLE - this covers you being in Recovery mode, learning new exercise, starting or re-starting exercise regime or recovering from an injury. Keep in mind: select small range of motion, slow down the speed and focus more on the linear movements.

  1. LARGE BUBBLE - if you are selecting this bubble you are a beast. You know what you are doing, you feel great and you are familiar with everything in the program. You also want to move with a large range of motion, add speed, power and some complexity.


    OK, now you know what you need to know. Keep things simple, if something doesn’t feel right stop doing it and get back to it next time. Enjoy your training.

LMT LIBRARY